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at the convergence of 50 research reports that talked about the dangers of cell phone use in testinand texting devicee driving. there was so little understanding about this. we had a massive debate. we knew this was very danger is behavior based on the research. we come from at traffic safety perspective, and we know the way to change this behavior follows the formula you heard ray lahood talk about. how you do that in the framework of very little conversation was the difficult part. a year ago on january we call for a nationwide ban on told a news and text to use while driving, and we called for companies to put in place policies prohibit the use of this. it was such a long debate press because of the lack of conversation. then i look at today and what we heard from secretary lahood and others. but that the amount of activity we have heard from a state legislative point of view, a research point of view, law enforcement point of view. i encourage you as we listen to our panelists today to think about how we maintain the momentum. i think all of us know that a year of action, even a tremendou
this together on such short notice. for those of us who are jews, , some jewish we know what it is like when people have attacked us verbally, attacked us physically and others remained silent. it tcjhhn>'n, americaw"# in 2010 without the response of the religious community. we speak out because we know that hate crimes and hate speech are not mere acts of disreputableiv! assaults or arsons or derivative their attacks on the pillars of the public and the guarantors of our freedom. betrayalo >> what an honor and privilege is for me having stood on the mall for years ago under similar circumstances where we were talking about liberty and justice for all. the statement that we have worked together collectively reads the sleeve. religious leaders denounced anti- muslim bigotry, call for america's respect for tradition a religious liberty. as religious leaders in this great country we have come together in our nation's capital to denounce categorically the derision, misinformation, and outright bigotry being directed against america's muslim community. we bear a sacred responsibility to honor ame
for being with us on this friday. let's tell you what we're doing next. we will take you to the bipartisan policy center here in washington, d.c. and the panel session that looks at what we have learned nine years after the 9/11 attacks. there is an evolving terrorist threat and there will be several speakers. live coverage begins shortly. thank you for being with us on this friday morning and we will see to morning -- tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. on "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >> we are leave at this national press club this morning where former 9/11 commission lee hamilton and tom cane will speak with reporters about how terrorist threats have changed since 9/11. the two are now co-chairs of the national security preparedness group of the bipartisan policy center. it's an organization founded three years ago by former senate majority leader tom daschle. bob dole, georg
%. if i may proud independence. -- i'm a proud independent. if you look at our infrastructure, who uses mass transit more -- middle class, lower class, or upper class? i would say is middle or lower. guest: certainly, it depends on where you are. the certainly, the average bus- writer in america has a slightly lower income -- the average bus rider in america has a slightly lower income than the average american household. however, the express between fort worth and dallas, for example, it tends to be middle and upper income the use that. across america, all strata of society use public transportation and depending on where the transit goes and what type of transit it is combined with the market is that they are seeking to reach, it could be of -- it could be either very high income, that is with the commuter rail lines in new york or chicago or san francisco are an example of. it can be no american income americans going back and forth -- it can be middle-class american income going back and forth to work. it is a wide spectrum of people that use public transit. when i give these statis
political settlement. what makes us think that we can make some progress now? that is really only very recently that all the necessary elements of the campaign have come together. despite the fact that there have been western forces there since 2001, it is only rarely now that the necessary number of forces are deployed in afghanistan, as general petraeus has recently been making clear. one of our announcements had been a 40% increase in the development going to afghanistan. we have an economic protests that that is bought out by the afghans themselves. all these things have come together in recent times. the single most difficult problem we have faced in international affairs, but i think now we have the finest military minds, a good military plan, the necessary quantities of development and the experience of provincial reconstruction, and motivated key ministers in afghanistan, to have the best chance for success that it is possible to put together. i believe is right to maintain an effort to succeed, because i think the consequences of abandoning that effort now would be extremely s
. >> there was a column this week called, "a superpower super broke," talking about the u.s. it is estimated that there are about two hundred al-qaeda agents. >> how many? >> 200-300. >> i thought you said two hundred million-300 million. >> know, we are spending about $1 million apiece. this is the tip of the iceberg. this is a conceptual question. is there any thinking about approaches that are not so expensive that may be more affordable? >> let me turn your question a little bit on its head to say that this is actually the more affordable way of going in comparison to many of our other assistance programs, this is still not that large. compared to what we have to deal with in a country that is broken in the case of an iraq or en afghanistan, this is a very small amount. i would underscore, as the president and secretary have, that this is a matter for the international community. there are a lot of countries to have recognized this challenge and shown their commitment with their pocketbooks. it is a difficult time, obviously for us. you could argue that our british friends are on a very
at the time of economic and fiscal arrested, and second is this the best use of limited dollars given the pressing needs to take cover ou care of our people. i share the secretary's objectives are reducing duplication overhead and access in the defense enterprise and instilling a culture of savings and restraint across the department of defense. on august 9, the sector followed up by announcing a series of specific cost-cutting measures, including a reduction in funding and for service support contracts by 10% per year for three years, a freeze on the number of o.s.d. defense agencies, a freeze on the general officers, a review and reduction of the number of reports, studies, and advisory boards, new limits on positions and contractors for intelligence functions. i agree with the secretary on the rapidly-expanding service contractors who supports the department. too often in the past we have constrained and number of department of defense employees without raisplacing a limit on service contractors. and rather than saving money, we have lost badly needed talent, expertise, and institu
pensions were rewards of for a long work, and we used to regulate labor markets for companies. the retirement age, the existence of retirement age in our society is a function of decisions, both of increased productivity in the last century and decisions we made about allocating leisure. much of the leisure we chose to take from increased productivity went into shorter workweeks, went into longer vacations, earlier than in the last century, before say the 1950's. after the 1940's or so, much of the increased leisure went into what we call retirement, a time of non-work. we created this institution. it is malleable to some extent. it is also terribly important. the yearly retirement story is interesting. it begins to some extent with the unions very successfully negotiating 30-year and out early retirement options, and many of the unions that have defined benefits in many of the businesses agreed to early retirement provisions that served the purpose of on the one hand, rewarding workers for long-term service, and two, turning over the labor force. i say that because the flip s
with 31% of the vote. this is about an hour. >> good evening and thank you for joining us for this first gubernatorial debate. >> tonight's debate is brought to you by impact nevada. this is a partnership between ' the las vegas review journal" and pbs. >> rory reid and brian sandoval have released plans for improving education. we will hear from both candidates on this issue. >> the venue for tonight's debate, the andre agassi college preparatory academy. here is a man who really cares about education, andre agassi. [applause] >> thank you. good evening and welcome to the andre agassi college preparatory academy. i want to rory reid and brian sandoval for accepting this invitation to come here to share their thoughts on this vital issue, education. we built this school because we believe nothing has the power to change a child's life like a quality education. without an education a child cannot hope. without a quality system, a state cannot compete. the next governor will long be remembered for the effect on education. nevada is struggling economically. a huge portion of our state budge
for years and they have elected me to that. >> in new hampshire -- >> u.s. civil rights commission is holding a conference on civil rights in the 21st century and includes speeches and panel discussions on various aspects. business leaders and scholars discuss the legal and social tools available for fighting discrimination. >> including continued racial and ethnic disparities in important measures of well-being and success. this discussion obviously includes a consideration of public policy options, both old and new, but it goes beyond public policy by also asking about the limits of government action and what the right mix of government and nongovernment action should be. in a pre-conference conference call with the panel members, we identified the following questions as relevant. they don't have to answer them all, but i'm going to repeat them anyway and if they go off on more brilliant things i might turn them back to a few of these questions. first, beyond rigorous enforcement of anti-discrimination law, ca can and should be done by government to narrow racial and ethnic dispa
, this has helped us a lot combat the production. we formed in east tennessee, what was the southeast tennessee meth task force which was a local, state and federal partnership because methamphetamine production can't be combat the exclusively at the state and local level. they just simply can't. they didn't have the resources to surveil it. it becomes a toxic site where it is made, so they didn't have the resources to clean it up. and it grew to be the east tennessee meth task force and now it is a statewide task force. we have had tremendous success. but we have to continue to modernize the laws, including federal component in order for drug professionals to be able to keep it out of the hands of people who are addicted, because they produce this, most of the time, for use. and as a result, this is just a deadly, deadly disease out in the hinterland of america and we have to fight it. this bill is another step in the right direction. congressman gordon and i worked together and congressman cooper passed a bill a few years ago to create federal grant support of the children who are t
have used -- pack as far as cannabis goes, the vast majority of us have used it. as far as afghanistan and opium, we saw on the news where our soldiers were guarding the poppy fields. we're using our tax dollars to guard the poppy fields. this is a joke. as far as the opium and cocaine, and do not know, that marijuana is not that bad. it should be legalized. i do not use it no more. it is not that big a deal. thank you. guest: 2 richard and all of the other callers, one of the great advantages of living in the american society is we can have this dialogue and you get to this dialogue and you get to speak your piece, but clearly i cannot change the laws and the united states. elected officials get paid to do that. as long as illegal and unlawful, something i believe is correct and we should not be making illegal, then we are duty bound to enforce the laws. respectfully, i would tell you to direct your comments to congress. host: what keeps you awake at night, what worries you the most with respect to the importation of illegal drugs? guest: it is the drug trade and transnational crimina
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12